Home My Military Vision EYELIDS – Military Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
EYELIDS – Military Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
Friday, 27 March 2009 23:00

 

These are the Army military regulations used at MEPS and military processing centers for the entrance vision standards for eye diseases and visual acuity.

 

This is an extrapolated version of AR 40-501 2-12.  This section describes eye diseases and visual acuity standards for entrance into the United States military.  Included here are the disqualifying conditions, a brief description of the condition, and what challenges a condition or disease may create for a new soldier.

 

This section relates to conditions and diseases of the EYE LIDS that are disqualifying.

 

I am interested in joining the military.  What are the military regulations and standards regarding eye lid conditions?

 

 

A. Eye Lids

 

Eye lids are extremely important for normal eye health and good visual acuity.  Eye lids contain glands that produce oils necessary for the eye to stay moist and healthy as well as help provide clear vision.  If the eyelids have a disease or are deformed this can cause complications and eye problems.

 

 

Disqualifying conditions:

 

1.  Blepharitis, chronic or acute, until cured

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Blepharitis is a condition that involves inflammation of the eyelid margins.   If severe or left untreated this condition can progress and cause addition eye problems.  Severe blepharitis can cause  itch, discomfort, burning, tearing, crusting of the eyelids.  This can lead to more serious cornea diseases which can prevent training. The condition can cause significant time lost in training.

 

2.  Blepharospasm

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Blepharospasm is a condition where ones eyelid muscle contract uncontrollably.  This can be uncontrolled blinking, twitching or the inability to open one’s eyes.  This condition can limit one’s ability to see and can affect visual tasks during training

 

3.  Dacryocystitis, acute or chronic

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Dacryocystitis is the inflammation or infection of the lacrimal sac.  One will have redness, swelling and tenderness in the area next to the nose.  There will usually be discharge from the punta in the eye or nose. Dacryocystitis can become chronic and/or recurrent.  This condition can also become severe and require hospitalization if not treated or continues to worsen.  It may also require surgical correction.  The condition can cause significant time lost in training and limit a soldier’s ability to deploy.

 

4.  Eyelid Deformity -- Deformity of the lids, complete or extensive lid deformity, sufficient to interfere with vision or impair protection of the eye from exposure

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Lid deformity can be cause from eye or eye lid diseases, trauma, or birth defects.  Often lid deformities can lead to serious eye conditions from exposure and dryness of the eye.  Some common conditions eyelid deformities cause are dry eyes, exposure keratopathy, and/or nuerotrophic ulcers.  Lid deformities often require surgical correction.  This condition can limit the ability of a soldier to train and provide serious hardships if deployed to an extreme environment like Iraq or Afghanistan.

 

5.  Eyelid Growths or Tumors -- Current growths or tumors of the eyelid, other than small, non-progressive, asymptomatic, benign lesions

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Growths and tumors of the eyelid often require specialized surgical correction.  This can lead to eyelid deformities and complications that arise from eyelid deformities.  Some common conditions eyelid deformities cause are dry eyes, exposure keratopathy, and nuerotrophic ulcers.  This condition can  limit the ability of a soldier to train and provide serious hardships if deployed to an extreme environment like Iraq or Afghanistan.

 


 

Below is the exact AR 40-501 military army regulation for this section.

AR 40-501 2–12. Eyes


a. Lids.


(1) Current blepharitis (373), chronic or acute, until cured (373.00), is disqualifying.
(2) Current blepharospasm (333.81) is disqualifying.
(3) Current dacryocystitis, acute or chronic (375.30) is disqualifying.
(4) Deformity of the lids (374.4), complete or extensive lid deformity, sufficient to interfere with vision or impair protection of the eye from exposure is disqualifying.
(5) Current growths or tumors of the eyelid, other than small, non-progressive, asymptomatic, benign lesions, are disqualifying.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 January 2013 00:42
 

How To Prevent Scratching Your New Glasses

News image

There is nothing worse than spending $500 on a beautiful pair of glasses with high quality lenses and scratching them shortly after yo... Read more.

What Eyelid Hot Compresses Can Do for You

It is very common for eye care professionals to recommend hot compresses for eye lid diseases. Some of the more ... Read more.

What you SHOULD NOT do with Contact Lenses

News image

Contact lenses are considered medical devices and require a prescription from an eyecare professional.  They are regulated by the FDA because if used ... Read more.

-
+
5

By using this website you signify your agreement to the Terms and Conditions Policy

Copyright © 2009 VisionOneSource.com. All Rights Reserved.