Home My Military Vision CONJUNCTIVA – Military Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
CONJUNCTIVA – Military Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
Friday, 27 March 2009 23:00

 

These are the Army military regulations used at MEPS and military processing centers for the entrance vision standards for eye diseases and visual acuity.

 

This is an extrapolated version of AR 40-501 2-12.  This section describes eye diseases and visual acuity standards for entrance into the United States military.  Included here are the disqualifying conditions, a brief description of the condition, and what challenges a condition or disease may create for a new soldier.

 

This section relates to eye conditions and diseases of the CONJUNCTIVA that are disqualifying.

 

I am interested in joining the military.  What are the military regulations and standards regarding conjunctival (conjunctiva) conditions?

 

 

B.  Conjunctiva.

 

The conjunctiva is the white part of the eye.  This is the part of the eye that gets red when one has eye irritation, an infection, or inflammation.  There are a few chronic conditions of the conjunctiva that are disqualifying for the military.

 

Disqualifying conditions:

 

 

1.  Conjunctivitis -- Current or chronic conjunctivitis, including, but not limited to trachoma and chronic allergic conjunctivitis

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

There are types of conjunctivitis conditions that can be chronic and lead to ocular  scaring and severe discomfort.  This can cause multiple related problems like dry eyes, decrease of vision, and pain.  This condition can limit the ability of a soldier to train and can cause serious hardships if deployed to an extreme environment like Iraq or Afghanistan.


2.  Pterygium -- Current or recurrent pterygium, if condition encroaches on the cornea in excess of 3 mm, or interferes with vision, or is a progressive peripheral pterygium, or recurring pterygium after two operative procedures

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Pterygium is a condition where conjuctival tissue grows onto the cornea (clear part of the eye).  Pterygiums cause irritation, redness and decrease of vision.  Pterygiums can advance and cover one’s central vision and cause a decrease in vision.  Often pterygiums require surgery and 50% of the time they can reoccur.  Pterygiums are caused by ocular irritation, dryness and UV exposure.  Extreme environment like Iraq and/or Afghanistan can cause this condition to worsen significantly.

 

3.  Xerophthalmia, dry eyes

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Xerophthalmia is basically dry eyes.  If one is diagnosis with severe dry eyes this can cause corneal and conjunctival problems like chronic conjunctivitis, exposure keratitis, or neurotrophic ulcer. These conditions can decrease one’s visual acuity and require significant medical care. Extreme environments like Iraq and/or Afghanistan can cause this condition to worsen significantly.

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Below is the exact AR 40-501 military army regulation for this section.

 

AR 40-501 2–12. Eyes


b. Conjunctiva.


(1) Current chronic conjunctivitis (372.1), including, but not limited to trachoma (076) and chronic allergic conjunctivitis (372.14), is disqualifying.
(2) Current or recurrent pterygium, (372.4), if condition encroaches on the cornea in excess of 3 mm, or interferes with vision, or is a progressive peripheral pterygium (372.42), or recurring pterygiumafter two operative procedures (372.45), is disqualifying. (3) Current xerophthalmia (372.53) is disqualifying.

 

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 14 January 2013 00:43
 

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