Home My Military Vision OCULAR MOBILITY AND MOTILITY – Military Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
OCULAR MOBILITY AND MOTILITY – Military Entrance Standards for Medical Fitness
Friday, 27 March 2009 23:00

 

These are the Army military regulations used at MEPS and military processing centers for the entrance vision standards for eye diseases and visual acuity.

 

This is an extrapolated version of AR 40-501 2-12.  This section describes eye diseases and visual acuity standards for entrance into the United States military.  Included here are the disqualifying conditions, a brief description of the condition, and what challenges a condition or disease may create for a new soldier.

 

This section relates to ocular mobility and motility conditions that are disqualifying.

 

I am interested in joining the military.  What are the military regulations and standards regarding ocular mobility and motility conditions?

 

 

H. Ocular mobility and motility

 

1.  Diplopia, or double vision

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Diplopia, double vision, can either be classified as monocular double vision or binocular double vision.  Monocular double vision is when one has double vision in one eye only.  This can be caused by refractive error, corneal opacities, irregular cornea, cataracts, macular or retinal disease.  Binocular double vision occurs when both eyes are open. This is typically cause by myasthenia gravis, decompensation of phoria, nerve palsy, thyroid eye disease, internuclear ophthalmoplegia, trauma or brain lesion.  Both monocular and binocular double vision are disqualifying.  These conditions can limit a soldier’s ability to train successfully and/or deploy.

 

 

2.  Nystagmus  other than physiologic “end-point nystagmus”

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Nystagmus is when the eyes have a random movement that is uncontrollable.  Nystagmus is often congenital, patient was born with it.  However, this is a disqualifying condition for the military.  Nystagmus will limit the soldier’s ability to train especially on basic rifle marksmanship (imaging trying to shot a target that is constantly moving.)

 

3.  Esotropia  and hypertropia.   For entrance into the USMA or ROTC programs, the following conditions are also disqualifying: esotropia of over 15 prism diopters; exotropia of over 10 prism diopters; hypertropiaof over 5 prism diopters.

 

Why is this disqualifying?

 

Esotropia is a condition where the eye turns in towards the nose.  Hypertropia is a condition where the eye turns up towards one’s eyebrows.  Both conditions are disqualifying.  Not sure why.  These conditions are typically not progressive and soldiers will do fine in training.  Get a waiver!

 

 


 

Below is the exact AR 40-501 military army regulation for this section of eye disease and vision.

AR 40-501 2–12. Eyes


h. Ocular mobility and motility.


(1) Current diplopia (386.2) is disqualifying.
(2) Current nystagmus (379.50) other than physiologic “end-point nystagmus” is disqualifying.
(3) Esotropia (378.0), and hypertropia (378.31). For entrance into the USMA or ROTC programs, the following conditions are also disqualifying: esotropia of over 15 prism diopters; exotropia of over 10 prism diopters; hypertropia of over 5 prism diopters.

Last Updated on Monday, 14 January 2013 00:44
 

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